Category: D.I.Y.

Cityscape

While working on some improvisational piecing, I came up with this design. It looks like a modern cityscape to me, which is appropriate because I have some news. Yesterday, I received my acceptance letter to the University of Utah’s Graduate Architecture Program. You can read more about that here.

And if you’re interested, take a peak at how this improvisational piece came to be:

improvisional piecingimprovisional piecingimprovisional piecing

How to Cut a Chain of Paper Dolls

how to cut a chain of paper dolls You may remember cutting a chain of paper dolls from your childhood, but may not remember the exact procedure. These directions will help stir your memory and get you crafting.

A few months back, I wrote about “Crafts for Kids with Scrap Fabric”.  These paper dolls are a great extension or variation to that project.

And before I get to the tutorial part of this post, I wanted to make an announcement.  At Craft Lake City this Saturday, I will be hosting a craft booth where kids can make these paper doll chains.  Come on by!

craft lake city 2012

DIY Paper Doll Chain

Things You’ll Need:

• Construction paper or card-stock (old file folders also work great)

• Pen or pencil

• Scissors and glue

• Doll Template

• Craft supplies such as scrap fabric, markers, crayons, yarn, etc.

Instructions:

1. Fold paper into an accordion with equal parts. (Note: 9×12 construction paper gets folded in half, 12×18 construction paper gets folded in thirds, old file folders get folded in fourths, etc)

2. Take the accordion folded paper, and using the doll template, draw a doll shape on to the top panel of the paper. Make sure to touch side to side with arms/hands and additional points if desired, such as the skirt and/or feet.

doll template

chain paper doll tutorial

3. Cut along the drawn outline, making sure not to cut into the linking arms/hands.

4. Open the chain of paper dolls and color or decorate the dolls with scrap fabric, yarn, crayons, markers, etc.

5. Consider drawing non-traditional forms, such as animals or aliens, for additional creativity.

DIY Paper Doll Chain tutorial

Happy crafting!

EZ Dresden Challenge: A Quilted Beach Bag

dressden beach bag quilted by The Artists' House Angela FlickerWelcome to day twelve of the Salt Lake Modern Quilt Guild blog hop for the EZ Dresden Challenge.  Have you been following this?

The Salt Lake Modern Quilt Guild has partnered with EZ Quilting, Simplicity and a host of other manufacturers to celebrate Darlene Zimmerman’s 20th Anniversary designing quilting tools for EZ Quilting. To help them celebrate, Salt Lake MQG is hosting a challenge — Use the EZ Dresden Ruler to create a project, then enter it to win amazing prizes, including a new sewing machine and a photo of your project in a 1/3 page Simplicity advertisement in Quilting Arts Magazine.  How exciting is that?!  Leave a comment, and you could win one of these awesome rulers.  I will announce the winner in a week, on the 19th of June. For more information regarding this challenge, follow this EZ Dresden Challenge link.
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EZ Dresden Quilting Challenge
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
For the past few summers, I’ve wanted to make myself a really bright, yet simple beach bag.
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Colorful umbrellas, beach balls, and sailboats were my inspiration.

I also knew that I wanted the bag to be deep, to hold rolled towels, and the bag had to have a nice zipper pocket to hold smaller-hard-to-find items like chapstick.  I’m really happy with the results. I can’t wait for our first beach/pool outing, as I think this bag will be perfect and fun in the sun.

.Here’s what my project looked like, right before I turned it into a bag.  I was intentional about picking a bold fabric for the background, as I wanted the sun to play on the dresden pieces, making the background shine through.
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
The collage of images below, show some of my work.  Really, it was quite simple.  I basically laid the pieces out, put right sides together, sewed, ironed the seam allowances open, and repeated until I had one long, snake-like piece. I’m not a fan of raw edges, so to finish the piece off I sewed around it with a 1/4″ stitch, and then used this stitch as a guide to help me iron a 1/4″ under around all the sides.  I then used washable basting glue and lightly glued the dresden piece down before using a zigzag stitch (clear thread) to sew around the entire exterior.  Lastly, I basted and quilted the piece.
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
Here is the finished product.  I really like how the chevron print shines through.
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag zipper inside bag
ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag

Remember, leave a comment, and you could win one of these awesome rulers.  I will announce the winner in a week, on the 19th of June.

For more inspiration and ideas for the EZ Dresden Challenge, follow along with the blog hop:

EZDresden_Logos

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Our lucky winner is #9, Jenny C

2012/06/12 at 12:03 pm

Love your bag! Have fun in the sun!

Thanks for your comment Jenny.  I hope you love the ruler!  I can’t wait to see what you create with it!

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Nesting

For the past 5 months, I have sewn for everyone but my family.  The work has been wonderful, and I have enjoyed making every piece, yet at the same time I have longed to sew for my daughter, and the little boy in my belly.  This past week, I took a day off and did exactly that –I made a few skirts for my daughter.  Here’s the pattern I used (it’s a great free pattern from Oliver + S).  I’m so happy with how the skirts turned out, and I’d be lieing if I said I didn’t love all the compliments we get in public.


I have one more custom quilt to finish this weekend, and then my work will be done.  I have about 10 other projects I can’t wait to jump into, including the baby’s quilt.  And so officially, I think “the nesting” stage has kicked in.

Because people, smiles and laughter, more than anything else, is truly what makes a house a home, I hope you enjoyed this weeks “moment”…

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om [one moment] meet upOM is *one moment* and is a meetup designed to notice & relish a moment in everyday life. The meetup idea was created by Linda at her blog, a la mode stuff.  If you’d like to participate in OM, just click the button and you’ll be taken to Linda’s post explaining it all.

Fabric Applique’ Greeting Cards

Featured on Moda Bake Shop

Caring for Baby Chicks and an Urban Garden

caring for baby chicksMy family roots tie me to farmers, yet I find myself drawn to wanting to live in the city– I sometimes feel like I’m living a double life.  My backyard, while very small, is a garden haven in the summer.  Most of the yard is filled with raised beds where we grow various vegetables.  In the spring, we cover the raised beds with green house covers so that we can have a cold crop before we plant the summer crop around Mother’s Day.  We also compost.  And now, as thought our little city garden wasn’t enough, we have added chickens to the mix.

caring for baby chicks

caring for baby chicks

I can not tell you the joy these little chicks have brought to my home.  About 10 times a day, my little daughter says, “Mommy, lets go see the chickens”, and to be honest, I think I would visit them just as often, even without my daughters prompts.

cold crop plants and green houseAlong with that, my husband, daughter, and I have spent a ton of time in the garden.  Along with sewing, gardening is therapy to my soul.  So soothing and rewarding.  My moment for this week came when I realized that my daughter honestly loves gardening as much as I do.  Often, on nice days, we don’t even get out of our pajamas, instead we head straight outside to play in the dirt.  I wonder, is there a garden gene, do family roots run that deep?  Just like I use to sit with my grandmother and “help” in the garden, Monet now does the same with me.

Because people, smiles and laughter, more than anything else, is truly what makes a house a home, I hope you enjoyed this weeks “moment”…

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om [one moment] meet upOM is *one moment* and is a meetup designed to notice & relish a moment in everyday life. The meetup idea was created by Linda at her blog, a la mode stuff.  If you’d like to participate in OM, just click the button and you’ll be taken to Linda’s post explaining it all.

Don’t Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids’ Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Instead of buying new all the time, throwing out the old or the broken, try fixing things instead.

Last April, I participated in an event called, April Stash Bust.  The idea behind this event was to use what you had, instead of buying new, for the entire month of April, in honor of Earth Day.  I gladly participated in this event because I believe in being a wise consumers for the sake of our planet.  Here is a fun example of where I re-purposed an old mini-skirt into a reversible bag.

Just this week, instead of going out and buying Monet a new pair of shoes, I fixed her old shoes.  These shoes were hand-be-downs from my sisters two girls.  They are adorable, but they would never stay on Monet’s feet because the velcro was worn out.  Along with that, it seems Monet always wants to taker her velcro shoes off and I wanted these babies to stay on, so when I went to fix them, I used snap fasteners instead of velcro.

Here are the shoes beforehand:

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

First, I removed the old velcro.

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Then, I followed the directions on the back of the  Dritz Snap Fastener Easy Attachment Kit box.

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Presto, the shoes are fixed.  They now stay on my daughters feet, and are her favorite shoes and are our favorite shoes.

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

So remember, instead of buying new all the time, throwing out the old or the broken, try fixing things instead.

“Quilting 101” Quilt-Along: Quilt Binding

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-Along

For those of you who are following the “Quilting 101″ quilt-along in 2011, we are now on step #5, our last step of our quilt-along.  Today, I’m going to guide you through the steps you need to follow in order to master quilt binding.  We will be making double fold binding with mitered corners, and sewing it on by hand. It’s not too late to join this “Quilting 101″ quilt-along in 2011 –just follow the before-mentioned link.

Step #1:  First, figure out how much binding you need, by following the before mentioned link for help.  Please realize though, I recommend cutting the binding 2.5 in size, instead of 2.25 like mentioned in the link I suggested.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #2:  We will be cutting our binding 2.5″ thick and on the bias (or the diagonal) of the fabric.  Using a right angle tool of some sort, cut a small right angle triangle off the bottom corner of your fabric.  Continue to cut the binding strips,  2.5″ wide, along the bias of the fabric, using a straight-edge and a rotary cutter.  Here’s a great How to Cut Bias Binding Video, if you would like additional information.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #3:  Find two corners where the slopes are running opposite directions, put right sides together, and pin.  It should look like the photo above.  And in case my picture above isn’t good enough, here’s another photo:

We will be making double fold binding with mitered corners.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #4: Sew a straight line along the two edges, using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #5:  The results should look like this.  Continue to sew all your binding pieces together, until they are one big long piece, a piece that is as long as the entire perimeter of your quilt, plus 20 inches or so.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #6:  Iron all your seam allowances flat.  Find the end, or the beginning, either side will do, and iron it under like shown above.  Iron your binding in half, for the entire horizontal length of the binding strip.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #7:  Now, take your binding and your quilt over to your machine.  Starting with the end that is ironed over, open up your binding and sew it down for about 8 inches, locking your threads in at the beginning and the end.  Stop and cut your threads.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #8:  Fold the binding in half, along that ironed horizontal line, and starting where you left off, sew the binding to the quilt, sewing through both layers of the binding, and all the layers of your quilt, using 1/4″ seam allowance.  Stopping about a 1/4″ before you get to the end of the corner.  Lock your threads in, cut your threads, and pull your quilt out from your machine.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #9:  At the corners of the quilt, first you’ll pull the binding straight, and then fold it back on itself to make a right angle.  See pictures above.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #10:  Next, you’ll carefully pull the binding back down along the edge of the quilt, still keeping that right angle fold underneath.  Begin sewing again.  Do all the corners this same way.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #11:  When you get back around to where you started, you’re going to want to cut off any excess binding, and tuck the raw end of the binding in the little pocket that you previously made.  Be careful to cut the binding to the correct length, so that it’s long enough to hide in the pocket, at least an inch.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #12:  Smooth everything out, and sew the pocket closed, stopping about an inch past where you originally began at the very beginning.  Make sure to lock your threads in place again.

Step #13:  Your binding is now sewn onto the one side of your quilt.  Fold the binding over, to the other side of the quilt, and hand stitch it down.  Here’s a great tutorial on how to hand stitch bind invisibly –check it out.

If you’re still confused, here are a few other links that could help:

Making and Adding Binding

How to Bind a Quilt Video

Great!  I hope this tutorial was helpful.

On a side note, before I wrote this tutorial, I already finished my two quilts and mailed them off to my nieces.  Last night my sister confirmed that after just one day, a potty accident already happened and the quilt needed to be washed.  She confirmed that the quilt still looks just as beautiful!

order a custom made quiltStep #14:  Please, leave a comment below and let me know where you are in this quilt-along, what else I can do to help –I’m open to any thoughts, questions, or comments you might have.

Making a House a Home: Book Recomendations

crafting a meaningful home by meg mateo ilasco

Monet and I spend a lot of time at book stores, as it is an outing that both she and I enjoy.  Just the other day I added “Crafting A Meaningful Home” to my collection.  I now have all of Meg’s books.  When it comes to the art of making a house a home, lately I have noticed a lot of great books that support this idea.  Here are a few of my recommendations:

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