Category: Tutorial

EZ Dresden Challenge: A Quilted Beach Bag

dressden beach bag quilted by The Artists' House Angela FlickerWelcome to day twelve of the Salt Lake Modern Quilt Guild blog hop for the EZ Dresden Challenge.  Have you been following this?

The Salt Lake Modern Quilt Guild has partnered with EZ Quilting, Simplicity and a host of other manufacturers to celebrate Darlene Zimmerman’s 20th Anniversary designing quilting tools for EZ Quilting. To help them celebrate, Salt Lake MQG is hosting a challenge — Use the EZ Dresden Ruler to create a project, then enter it to win amazing prizes, including a new sewing machine and a photo of your project in a 1/3 page Simplicity advertisement in Quilting Arts Magazine.  How exciting is that?!  Leave a comment, and you could win one of these awesome rulers.  I will announce the winner in a week, on the 19th of June. For more information regarding this challenge, follow this EZ Dresden Challenge link.
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EZ Dresden Quilting Challenge
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
For the past few summers, I’ve wanted to make myself a really bright, yet simple beach bag.
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Colorful umbrellas, beach balls, and sailboats were my inspiration.

I also knew that I wanted the bag to be deep, to hold rolled towels, and the bag had to have a nice zipper pocket to hold smaller-hard-to-find items like chapstick.  I’m really happy with the results. I can’t wait for our first beach/pool outing, as I think this bag will be perfect and fun in the sun.

.Here’s what my project looked like, right before I turned it into a bag.  I was intentional about picking a bold fabric for the background, as I wanted the sun to play on the dresden pieces, making the background shine through.
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
The collage of images below, show some of my work.  Really, it was quite simple.  I basically laid the pieces out, put right sides together, sewed, ironed the seam allowances open, and repeated until I had one long, snake-like piece. I’m not a fan of raw edges, so to finish the piece off I sewed around it with a 1/4″ stitch, and then used this stitch as a guide to help me iron a 1/4″ under around all the sides.  I then used washable basting glue and lightly glued the dresden piece down before using a zigzag stitch (clear thread) to sew around the entire exterior.  Lastly, I basted and quilted the piece.
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
Here is the finished product.  I really like how the chevron print shines through.
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ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag
ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag zipper inside bag
ez dresden quilt challenge quilted beach bag

Remember, leave a comment, and you could win one of these awesome rulers.  I will announce the winner in a week, on the 19th of June.

For more inspiration and ideas for the EZ Dresden Challenge, follow along with the blog hop:

EZDresden_Logos

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Our lucky winner is #9, Jenny C

2012/06/12 at 12:03 pm

Love your bag! Have fun in the sun!

Thanks for your comment Jenny.  I hope you love the ruler!  I can’t wait to see what you create with it!

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Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern

Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern

I’m teaching a sewing camp in my home this week and one of the items my students made was this adorable Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern.  I made one for my daughter and used it as a sample for my students.  The pattern was well written, super easy, and the results were adorable.

Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern

Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt PatternOliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt PatternOliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern

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Here are my students:

Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern

This pattern is a keeper for sure, and so here’s that link again:  Oliver + S Lazy Days Free Skirt Pattern.

Happy Sewing!

Featured on Moda Bake Shop

Don’t Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids’ Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Instead of buying new all the time, throwing out the old or the broken, try fixing things instead.

Last April, I participated in an event called, April Stash Bust.  The idea behind this event was to use what you had, instead of buying new, for the entire month of April, in honor of Earth Day.  I gladly participated in this event because I believe in being a wise consumers for the sake of our planet.  Here is a fun example of where I re-purposed an old mini-skirt into a reversible bag.

Just this week, instead of going out and buying Monet a new pair of shoes, I fixed her old shoes.  These shoes were hand-be-downs from my sisters two girls.  They are adorable, but they would never stay on Monet’s feet because the velcro was worn out.  Along with that, it seems Monet always wants to taker her velcro shoes off and I wanted these babies to stay on, so when I went to fix them, I used snap fasteners instead of velcro.

Here are the shoes beforehand:

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

First, I removed the old velcro.

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Then, I followed the directions on the back of the  Dritz Snap Fastener Easy Attachment Kit box.

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Presto, the shoes are fixed.  They now stay on my daughters feet, and are her favorite shoes and are our favorite shoes.

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

Don't Throw it Out, Fix it: Kids' Velcro Shoes and Snap Fasteners

So remember, instead of buying new all the time, throwing out the old or the broken, try fixing things instead.

Making a House a Home: Sewing Tutorials

sewing tutorials

When it comes to the art of making a house a home, I believe it’s important for some of the items in your home to be made by hand –I’m not talking about items just for your home, but items used by loved ones in your home as well.  Here are a few sewing tutorials that I hope inspire you to create something special for your space, and the people you love who live in it:

  1. Pleated Tote Bag Tutorial by U-Handbag
  2. Cathedral Windows Pillow Tutorial by House of a la Mode
  3. Headband Tutorial by JezzePrints
  4. Spider Web Quilt Block Tutorial by House of a la Mode
  5. Diamond Quilt Top Tutorial by Urban Patchwork
  6. Add a Zipper to your Pillow on Sew, Mama, Sew!

“Quilting 101” Quilt-Along: Quilt Binding

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-Along

For those of you who are following the “Quilting 101″ quilt-along in 2011, we are now on step #5, our last step of our quilt-along.  Today, I’m going to guide you through the steps you need to follow in order to master quilt binding.  We will be making double fold binding with mitered corners, and sewing it on by hand. It’s not too late to join this “Quilting 101″ quilt-along in 2011 –just follow the before-mentioned link.

Step #1:  First, figure out how much binding you need, by following the before mentioned link for help.  Please realize though, I recommend cutting the binding 2.5 in size, instead of 2.25 like mentioned in the link I suggested.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #2:  We will be cutting our binding 2.5″ thick and on the bias (or the diagonal) of the fabric.  Using a right angle tool of some sort, cut a small right angle triangle off the bottom corner of your fabric.  Continue to cut the binding strips,  2.5″ wide, along the bias of the fabric, using a straight-edge and a rotary cutter.  Here’s a great How to Cut Bias Binding Video, if you would like additional information.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #3:  Find two corners where the slopes are running opposite directions, put right sides together, and pin.  It should look like the photo above.  And in case my picture above isn’t good enough, here’s another photo:

We will be making double fold binding with mitered corners.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #4: Sew a straight line along the two edges, using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #5:  The results should look like this.  Continue to sew all your binding pieces together, until they are one big long piece, a piece that is as long as the entire perimeter of your quilt, plus 20 inches or so.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #6:  Iron all your seam allowances flat.  Find the end, or the beginning, either side will do, and iron it under like shown above.  Iron your binding in half, for the entire horizontal length of the binding strip.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #7:  Now, take your binding and your quilt over to your machine.  Starting with the end that is ironed over, open up your binding and sew it down for about 8 inches, locking your threads in at the beginning and the end.  Stop and cut your threads.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #8:  Fold the binding in half, along that ironed horizontal line, and starting where you left off, sew the binding to the quilt, sewing through both layers of the binding, and all the layers of your quilt, using 1/4″ seam allowance.  Stopping about a 1/4″ before you get to the end of the corner.  Lock your threads in, cut your threads, and pull your quilt out from your machine.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #9:  At the corners of the quilt, first you’ll pull the binding straight, and then fold it back on itself to make a right angle.  See pictures above.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #10:  Next, you’ll carefully pull the binding back down along the edge of the quilt, still keeping that right angle fold underneath.  Begin sewing again.  Do all the corners this same way.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #11:  When you get back around to where you started, you’re going to want to cut off any excess binding, and tuck the raw end of the binding in the little pocket that you previously made.  Be careful to cut the binding to the correct length, so that it’s long enough to hide in the pocket, at least an inch.

Quilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongQuilt Binding "Quilting 101" Quilt-AlongStep #12:  Smooth everything out, and sew the pocket closed, stopping about an inch past where you originally began at the very beginning.  Make sure to lock your threads in place again.

Step #13:  Your binding is now sewn onto the one side of your quilt.  Fold the binding over, to the other side of the quilt, and hand stitch it down.  Here’s a great tutorial on how to hand stitch bind invisibly –check it out.

If you’re still confused, here are a few other links that could help:

Making and Adding Binding

How to Bind a Quilt Video

Great!  I hope this tutorial was helpful.

On a side note, before I wrote this tutorial, I already finished my two quilts and mailed them off to my nieces.  Last night my sister confirmed that after just one day, a potty accident already happened and the quilt needed to be washed.  She confirmed that the quilt still looks just as beautiful!

order a custom made quiltStep #14:  Please, leave a comment below and let me know where you are in this quilt-along, what else I can do to help –I’m open to any thoughts, questions, or comments you might have.

Hand Dyed Wool Giveaway + Wool Applique Tutorial

hand dyed wool for applique and quilting

Today, I bring you another fabulous giveaway, along with a wool applique tutorial.  About a week ago, I received a beautiful bundle of hand dyed wool in the mail from Quilting Acres Shop.  Along with that, Erinn sent me a piece of gray hand dyed wool to use on one of my wool applique projects.  And can I just say, the hand dyed wool that she sent me was the prettiest wool I have ever seen.  The colors are magnificent, and the wool is super soft and easy to work with.  This wool is of the highest quality!  In fact, I really don’t want to give it away.  Do you mind if I leave a comment, “heart” Erinn’s shop, and subscribe to my own newsletter, so that I too can have a chance to win?

Here’s a little bit of information about Erinn’s shop, “Welcome to Quilting Acres Shop. Here you will find hand dyed wool that is exceptionally soft to work with. I start with finding beautiful wools that I can then over-dye, felt, and create something wonderful with.  I dye my wool in stainless steel pots (mostly at nap time) and wash each piece in an earth friendly, fragrance free soap.  These wools are perfect for rug hooking, quilting, needle arts, wool applique, and many other craft projects.”

Wool Applique Tutorial:

Erinn is exactly right, these wools are perfect for wool applique!  Before I get to the tutorial part of this post, first let me show you a few examples of projects I’ve made in the past using wool applique:

wool applique tutorial or felt applique tutorial

So you might be wondering how wool applique is done.  Really it’s quite simple.  First you need to draw out the shape of what it is you want to create using the wool.  I’m going to create a couch in this tutorial.  Cut it out, and use this as your template:

wool applique tutorial

Next, you need to iron on a piece of heat bond, a little bit bigger than your template from the previous step.  Iron it onto the back of your felt, trace your template shape as a mirror image (otherwise the image will be reversed), and then cut it out.  Position the wool piece, glue side down, and iron it onto a fabric surface using the directions on the heat bond package:

wool applique tutorial

wool applique tutorial

Next, using a washable fabric pencil, draw in certain details that you want to show using machine embroidery:

wool applique tutorial

wool applique tutorial

Lastly, sew these lines using either hand or machine embroidery techniques:

wool applique tutorial

This pieces that I’m working on, still needs a little work, so you’ll have to wait to see the final product.  But in the mean time, I think you know this is the start of something magneficant.  Why don’t you get yourself some hand dyed wool, and give this wool applique tutorial a try.

Giveaway Details:  15 Pieces of Hand Dyed Wool

hand dyed wool giveaway

To enter, visit Quilting Acres Shop and leave a comment below telling me what you like best in Erinn’s shop.

For extra, extra, extra entries, you can “like” me on facebook, sign-up for my newsletter, “heart” our Etsy shops and/or publicize this event on twitter, facebbok, and/or your own blog. Tell me about it below, each as an individual comment, to improve your chances of winning.

The lucky winner will be announced on Thursday, February 24th.

Oh, and don’t forget to enter our other giveaway here.

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Blog Giveaway WInnerAnd our winner is…

Congratulations Marcia!

I’ll email you with the details.

Modern Sewing Tutorial: Turned Edge Machine Applique Pinwheel Pillow

“Quilting 101″ Quilt-Along: Sewing your Quilt-Top

For those of you who are following this “Quilting 101” quilt-along in 2011, we are now on step #2 of our quilt-along where we will be sewing our quilt-top.  To start, please gather your cut strips and use the diagram posted in “Quilting 101” quilt-along: Step #1.

“Quilting 101″ Quilt-Along in 2011: Sewing your Quilt-Top

I’ve put together a video that will step you though the next stage of this quilt-along.  This is my first video though, and so it seems a bit rough to me –maybe I’m just embarrassed to see myself on tape for the first time.  Please watch the entire video once, before you begin sewing.

Here are the basic steps:

1.  Layout the quilt-top pieces in order, according to the diagram.

2.  Pining right sides together, pin strip 1 to 2, strip 3 to 4, strip 5 to 6, etc.

3.  Sew, using a 1/4″ seam allowance, and press seam allowances open.

4.  Layout your new pieces, in order, according to the diagram.

5.  Pining right side together, pin strip set 1-2 to 3-4, strip set 5-6 to 7-8, etc.

6.  Sew, using a 1/4″ seam allowance, and press seam allowances open.

7.  Repeat until the entire quilt top is assembled (this will not include the border.)

Here is that video, that steps you though these same steps, in more detail:

Good luck!

quilting 101 quilt-along 2011 a handmade custom quilt

Please let me know if you have any question by posting them in the comments section below.  I can’t wait to see your quilt-tops assembled.

“Quilting 101” Quilt-Along: Quilt Diagram, Choosing Fabric & Cutting Fabric

Today we begin our "Quilting 101" quilt-along where we will look at a quilt diagram, choose fabric for our quilt, and cut the fabric for our quiltToday we begin our “Quilting 101” quilt-along where we will look at a quilt diagram, choose fabric for our quilt, and cut the fabric for our quilt.  If you’ve never made a quilt before, or if you have limited time but you’d like to participate, this is a great quilt-along to join.  The quilt design that we will be making is simple –a skilled quilter could finish this quilt in a few days.  If you haven’t yet joined, it’s not too late, the more the merrier.

Here are a few photos of the quilt we will be making:

custom made quilt and quilting 101 quilt-alongcustom made quilt and quilting 101 quilt-alongcustom made quilt and quilting 101 quilt-along

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Please read through this entire post, before you begin.  As you can see, we are dealing with a very basic quilt design, made up of stripes and a border.

Here is a diagram of the quilt:

quilting 101 quilt-along quilt diagram

And here are a few more photos:

quilting 101 quilt-along 2011 a handmade custom quiltquilting 101 quilt-along 2011 a handmade custom quilt

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Choosing Colors and Fabric:

As we quilt-along, I’m going to be using “relationships” as a metaphor to describe the parts and/or steps of making a quilt.  Today, I want to talk a little bit about coordinating fabrics since your first assignment is to gather supplies and purchase fabric.

In my eyes, coordinating fabrics is similar to how two peoples’ personalities might complement each other in a relationship.  If two people are exactly the same, the relationship might lack depth and seem bland.  Instead, I think it’s better when two peoples’ differences compliment the other’s personality.  For example, I am a very passionate person; I feel deeply and strongly about everything.  My husband on the other hand is more logical, more of a thinker.  I can not tell you how often this difference compliments our marriage and the decisions we make everyday.  Do I need to go more in depth, or do you get what I mean?

Coordinating fabrics and colors for a project is similar.  The fabrics you choose need to go together, but they also need to have an element that makes them different or makes them compliment each other in someway. Instead of recreating the wheel, here are a few helpful links I found online:  Color, Rule of Thumb & Color Basics for Quilting.

Once you’ve found your fabrics, I encourage you to use the diagram above like a coloring page to help you decide how you want the certain colors and patterns to coordinate and play together.

Ordering Fabric:

I order most of my fabric online because I love the selection online shopping offers.  My favorite online shops include Fabric Worm, Fabric Shack, and Above All Fabric.  I also think it’s great to support local quilt shops, if you’re lucky enough to have a good one in your area.

Fabric Amounts:

The quilt we are going to make for this quilt-a-long is approximately 48″ x 82″ in size.  This does fit the top of a twin size bed, but with very little hangover.  Ideally this quilt would serve as a throw or a blanket you fold up on the bottom of a bed.  It would be easy to make this quilt a bit wider by making the border a bit wider if you desire a bigger size, or smaller by taking some of the strips out if you want a smaller quilt for a young child.  Here’s how much fabric you’ll need to order:

  • Fabric A – 5/8 yard
  • Fabric B (large print optional) – 1 yard
  • Fabric C – 3/8 yard
  • Fabric D – 5/8 yard
  • Fabric for quilt binding (stripes, solids, or small prints work best) – 1 yard to be safe although 3/4 would work if you’re careful
  • Fabric E (border of the quilt & backing of the quilt) – 4 3/4 yards
  • Note:  if you want your border and your back to be different, you’ll need 2 3/8 yard of fabric E and an additional 4 3/4 yards for a solid back or 2 3/8 yards for a pieced back.  Let me know if you have any questions.

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Note:  I realize the above amounts changed a little from a comment I left a while back.  If you already purchased fabric and this is causing you problems, please let me know and I’ll help you work it out.  Basically, you’ll need to widen some of the strips and shorten others to balance out the fabric amounts you have.  If you have more than 4 fabrics that you’re wanting to work with, you could also add those in to make up the difference.  Sorry for the inconvenience.  I didn’t like how two of the fabrics I ordered looked and so I altered the pattern a bit.  I do hope you understand.  If you’re struggling, please email me and I’ll email you a diagram of the original quilt pattern, along with cutting instructions. Here is a diagram and the fabric amounts for that quilt…
quilting 101 quilt-along quilt diagram 2
  • Fabric A (large print) – 3/4 yard
  • Fabric B, C, D, E & F – 3/8 yard
  • Fabric G (border of the quilt) – 2 and 3/8 of a yard
  • Fabric H (binding) – 1 yard
  • Fabric I (back) – 4 3/4 yards for a solid back
  • Email me, or leave me a comment, if you would like a larger picture of this diagram.

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Washing Your Fabric:

I do NOT wash my fabrics before I use them.  The overall quality of fabric has increased significantly in the past decade and it seems that many people do NOT wash fabric before they sew anymore.  I took a twitter and facebook pole today and only one person reported washing before sewing.  It’s completely up to you, but I don’t wash before I sew and I’ve never experienced problems.

Cutting Fabric:

My biggest piece of advise is to measure twice and cut once!!!

If you have never used a rotary cutter before, here is a great Rotary Cutter Tutorial.

Cutting width of fabric, or from selvage to selvage, make the following cuts:

Fabric A:  A1 – 4.5″ x 41″, A2 – 6.5″ x 41″, A3 – 4.5″ x 41″, and A4 – 2.5″ x 41″

Fabric B:  B1 – 6.5″ x 41″, B2 – 10.5″ x 41″, and B3 – 14.5″ x 41″

Fabric C:  C1 – 2.5″ x 41″, C2 – 2.5″ x 41″, C3 – 2.5″ x 41″, and C4 – 4.5″ x 41″

Fabric D:  D1 – 4.5″ x 41″, D2 – 6.5″ x 41, and D3 – 8.5″ x 41″

Set fabric E, backing fabric, binding fabric, and/or border fabrics aside for later use.

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them for me in the comments section so that all participants can learn from each other thoughts.

I’ll post step #2 next week sometime –stay tuned and good luck!

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